Author Topic: Books about Greece  (Read 18009 times)

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Offline Maik

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Re: Books about Greece
« Reply #25 on: Thursday, 06 February, 2014 @ 02:13:06 »
#26 TonyKath. Posted 30-11-2012 @ 17:37

Thanks Maik. I found substantial and lavishly illustrated books of the collections of various major archaeological museums in Greece. Not ebooks in the downloadable sense but presented as books. You can further zoom in to make the text readable by clicking on a page. Very interesting - just need the time.

Tony

Offline Maik

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Re: Books about Greece
« Reply #26 on: Thursday, 06 February, 2014 @ 02:15:26 »
#27 Posted 26 January 2013 - 02:04 PM by TonyKath

Brilliant - thanks for getting this back Maik!  Must have been a bit of a chore re-posting one by one.

I had looked at this a couple of days before the changeover.  It prompted me to buy Patricia Storace's Dinner with Persephone that Bryan recommended above.  Managed to get the last copy (second hand) from Amazon for - I kid you not - £1.88 inc postage.  Got a few other things on before I start it though.

In addition my Greek teacher has put us on to http://www.bibliagora.co.uk a Greek online bookshop in the UK.  Carries a huge amount of Greek fiction as well as language books.  But very pricey  :unsure:. Grant & Cutler used to be good but now part of Foyles and declined somewhat but still worth checking out.  Visited the shop once as a student - lovely place full of foreign language books.

Tony

Offline Maik

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Re: Books about Greece
« Reply #27 on: Thursday, 06 February, 2014 @ 02:17:40 »
#28 Posted 30 January 2013 - 10:44 PM by Jolly Roger

Just released in EBook form, Ionian Storms.

Quote
Price: $4.75

During WW2, two former allies, the Germans and the Italians, fought a little-known, mini-war on the island of Cephalonia, with tragic consequences for the local inhabitants and catastrophic ones for the Italians. The period of foreign occupation was followed by bitter civil strife which lasted a good seven years. And then, as the Cephalonians had, at last, started to rebuild their lives, the earthquakes of 1953 destroyed not just their towns and villages, but the very cultural fibre of their society.
The story runs in parallel to the active involvement, during this entire period, of a remarkable woman, who had landed on Cephalonia in the middle of the war, armed only with her violin.

The narration, which makes liberal use of her witty diaries, follows her as she experienced, and empathized with, the plight of the common people and, through her direct actions, became for many a beacon of hope and a safe haven.

Offline Maik

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Re: Books about Greece
« Reply #28 on: Thursday, 06 February, 2014 @ 02:19:03 »
#29 Posted 31 January 2013 - 11:29 AM by TonyKath

Sounds great and excellent value but only available in Epub format so won 't work on the Kindle.  There are some (illegal) ways round this but require some sleuthing and enhanced computer skills.  Any chance of them using the Amazon self-publishing system where I would think sales would be greater?  I'm involved in a Kindle Forum and authors seem to find Epub/iStores better for more "popular" books.  If it's self-published nothing to stop authors using both!

Tony

Offline Maik

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Re: Books about Greece
« Reply #29 on: Thursday, 06 February, 2014 @ 02:20:59 »
#30 Posted 03 February 2013 - 07:04 AM by Maik

Quote
#13 Jeanskala

Point and Counter Point by Nicholas Enessee

Quote
#28 Jolly Roger

Ionian Storms

Looks like the same book by the same author, wonder if "Ionian Storms" is the title in the US?

Offline Maik

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Re: Books about Greece
« Reply #30 on: Thursday, 06 February, 2014 @ 02:23:42 »
#31 Posted 04 February 2013 - 01:29 PM by Ian

Some of you may well remember Peter Hemming (the artist) and his partner Pam from when he was on the island a few years ago 2001 - 2007 ?

He's just released an autobiographical book called "Oil Paint and Greece" based on the time he spent on Kefalonia.

Offline Maik

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Re: Books about Greece
« Reply #31 on: Thursday, 06 February, 2014 @ 02:24:33 »
#32 Posted 07 February 2013 - 11:09 AM by jed.w

I wonder is it something about the island that inspires people to write.

I've often thought about putting down all the stories I've been told and adventures we've had over the last 30 years.  Maybe one day when life isn't so hectic!

Just bought your book Paul, I'll get down to reading it over the next few days.

jed.w

Offline Maik

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Re: Books about Greece
« Reply #32 on: Thursday, 06 February, 2014 @ 02:25:15 »
#33 Posted 07 February 2013 - 02:25 PM by TonyKath

Just downloaded a sample.  Looks quite expensive for a new ebook by an unknown author.  I'm also on the Kindle Users Forum where quite a number of indie authors discuss pricing ad nauseam.  Usually they have a period of free or nearly free sales to bump them up the sales ranks to get noticed.

Tony

Offline Maik

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Re: Books about Greece
« Reply #33 on: Thursday, 06 February, 2014 @ 02:35:32 »
#34 Posted 16 February 2013 - 07:57 PM by TonyKath

I've just finished reading Dinner with Persephone by Patricia Storace and recommended by Bryan above last September - thanks Bryan - I owe you a tsipouro or two for that!  :).  It is truly one of the finest books I ever read anywhere, let alone about Greece.  Storace is an American woman who spends a year in Athens and is obviously very well connected in literary circles and travels about considerably, particularly round the islands.  She is extraordinarily observant about Greek life, character (especially the religious life of Greece)  and the language.  She combines this with a dazzling, at times almost overwhelming erudition constantly linking present behaviour and attitudes to Greece's history, be it classical Greece, the Byzantine empire or the struggle for Independence.  Few Greeks can have the depth of knowledge she has.  Arriving at the time when the crisis over Macedonia was at its zenith Storace lifts some stones on the darker side of Greek national superiority.  She finds Greece funny, frustrating, enchanting, welcoming and at times repellent.  She reminds us that whatever the tourist face of Greece may be Greece has a long past and much of it in an Eastern tradition unknown to us.

Some of the best bits are quoted here: http://wordsutteredinhaste.blogspot.co.uk/2011/12/dinner-with-persephone-by-patricia.html

If you get a chance buy this book.  Unfortunately I bought the last copy (second hand) from Amazon for an amazing £1.88, though here is the link http://amzn.to/1bw7CRC

I'm just starting it again!

Tony

Offline Maik

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Re: Books about Greece
« Reply #34 on: Thursday, 06 February, 2014 @ 02:36:52 »
#35 Posted 16 February 2013 - 11:01 PM by Bryan-in-Kilkis

It is indeed a book to admire,Tony.  I still haven't finished my copy, bought years ago, but that is because of personal concerns rather than the quality of her writing, which is top-notch.  I do have to admit that what I have read so far does seem to view Greece, and especially Athens, though melancholically rose-tinted spectacles, but again that is quite probably a result of me reading it through my own highly cynical spectacles.

I remember only too well the years when Greece initially took against Macedonia - in those days the news was full of how the tanks from Macedonia would soon be rumbling across the border and taking over Northern Greece!!!   Greek paranoia at its height.  Knowing both countries well, I have to shake my head sadly and laugh at the pathetic Greek stance of the time.

Storace's Dinner with Persephone is definitely a book worth getting your teeth into.

Offline Maik

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Re: Books about Greece
« Reply #35 on: Thursday, 06 February, 2014 @ 02:37:31 »
#36 Posted 16 February 2013 - 11:02 PM by Bryan-in-Kilkis

PS I'll hold you to those two tsipouros, Tony!!  :)

Offline Maik

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Re: Books about Greece
« Reply #36 on: Thursday, 06 February, 2014 @ 03:10:33 »
#37 Posted 18 February 2013 - 07:00 AM by Maik

Kefalonia - An Insider’s Guide by yours, truly under the pen name Mike Leonidas is now available from Amazon.co.uk and kobobooks.com.

There’s a couple more books by Paul Johnson in Alex Mavros series now available, The Silver Stain and The Green Lady.

Books (e-books and ‘dead tree’) recommended in this thread are now available via the GGi bookshop, along with a few more I’ve added. Proceeds help pay GGi running costs.

Thanks for supporting GGi.

Offline Maik

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Re: Books about Greece
« Reply #37 on: Thursday, 06 February, 2014 @ 03:11:42 »
#38 Posted 18 February 2013 - 03:00 PM by TonyKath

Well done Maik for getting this done - I realise there has been an absolutely massive amount of work into the book (excellent!!), the publishing and now the Store.

Reviews from readers will help keep the book visible, as well as sales.  I am slightly implicated in it so can't review it myself as Amazon have started a tough policy on removing "authors' friends' " reviews.  I'm on a forum for Kindle users and authors, and even reviews that merely mention the author's first name have been summarily removed by Amazon.

Tony

Offline Maik

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Re: Books about Greece
« Reply #38 on: Thursday, 06 February, 2014 @ 03:16:16 »
#39 Posted 27 February 2013 - 03:47 PM by Maik

Another book that might be of interest: Not Even My Name by Thea Halo

Offline Maik

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Re: Books about Greece
« Reply #39 on: Thursday, 06 February, 2014 @ 03:17:01 »
#40 Posted 28 February 2013 - 09:38 PM by Paul Dillon

Thanks to all those who read and commented on my Kefalonia novel, The Magic in the Receiver. The Kindle version is FREE on Amazon until midnight this Saturday. Please download the heck out it. If you haven't got a Kindle device, there are free Kindle reader apps for most platforms.

I hope you enjoy. Please pass this on and help spread the word about Kefalonia.

Offline Maik

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Re: Books about Greece
« Reply #40 on: Thursday, 06 February, 2014 @ 03:40:44 »
#41 Posted 25 July 2013 - 12:16 AM by Maik

Just added a couple more books to the GGi bookshop. The first is the latest in the popular Greek Village series by Sara Alexi, titled The Gypsy's Dream.

The second I came across by chance when I was looking at the line of succession to the British throne (and was slightly surprised to find that 'gender equality' succession only received Royal Assent on 25 April 2013. Succession to the Crown Act 2013)
 
While wading through all the info I came upon a reference to Michael Abney-Hastings. The name struck a chord: Frank Abney-Hastings was one of the heroes of the Greek War of Independence whom I first read about about many years ago, either in George Finlay's History of the Greek Revolution (Vol. 1 / Vol. 2) or Thomas Gordon's History of the Greek Revolution (Vol. 1 / Vol. 2).

Seems there's reasons to doubt whether Edward IV was the legitimate son of Richard, Duke of York, and therefore whether he was a legitimate king of Britain. According to records, it seems his father and mother were 160 km apart when he was likely to have been conceived. If that were the case George Plantagenet, 1st Duke of Clarence, would have been the rightful king of Britain. In turn, Francis Hastings, 10th Earl of Huntingdon and Frank Abney-Hastings' grandfather, would have become king. However, the 10th Earl never married and his son, Charles, was also illegitimate. Had Charles been born in wedlock his first born son, also named Charles, would have become king. As Charles (the son) died without issue Frank Abney-Hastings would have become king of Britain. Britain's Real Monarch

Had he not earlier died a (largely forgotten) hero to the cause of Greek independence.

Frank Abney-Hastings joined the Royal Navy at age 11 and saw action at the Battle of Trafalgar. As a matter of honour he later challenged a senior officer to a duel and was subsequently discharged from the Royal Navy. He found the Greek War of Independence a suitable challenge and volunteered his services.  He introduced, and largely funded, the first steam-powered warship to see active service (the Royal Navy having rejected the idea). He was also the first to use shells and hot shot in modern warfare. He died of a relatively minor wound in the harbour of Zakynthos on 1 June, 1828. General Gordon, who served in the war and wrote its history, said of him: "If ever there was a disinterested and really useful Philhellene it was Hastings. He received no pay, and had expended most of his slender fortune in keeping the Karteria afloat for the last six months. His ship, too, was the only one in the Greek navy where regular discipline was maintained."

Haven't had a chance to read it yet but No. 1 on my book list: Commander of the Karteria: Honoured in Greece. Unknown at home.

Both available via the GGi bookshop


Offline Maik

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Re: Books about Greece
« Reply #41 on: Thursday, 06 February, 2014 @ 03:41:33 »
#42 Posted 26 July 2013 - 06:37 PM by Tony Kath

Very interesting !! Have downloaded a sample - so many books on my Kindle to read.  One or two that have been read to be mentioned here as well!

Tony

Offline Maik

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Re: Books about Greece
« Reply #42 on: Thursday, 06 February, 2014 @ 03:51:35 »
#43 Posted 11 December 2013 - 07:08 PM by IslandHopper

What a find!  Thanks very much for all the books listed at http://www.goinggreek.info/books.html! Have bookmarked the page and look forward to becoming immersed for a good few months!

I second the above recommendation of "Dinner with Persephone" by Patricia Storace.  Absolutely superb.  So good that I've often looked to see if she's written another book but she hasn't.  (I heard she was sued by some Greeks for possible plagiarism and had a hellish experience.  They claimed she'd lifted a number of pages from another book, possibly one in Greek.  Not sure how the court case panned out but she's not published anything since.)  Anyway, yes, a stunning book.

I think I may be able to add a winner for you.  Found it in "Public" (Syntagma) two months ago.  "Athens - the Truth: Searching for Mános, Just Before the Bubble Burst" by David Cade.  Tons of juicy stuff, mainly on Athens but also on Greece - modern history mainly.  Very good if you like Greek music.  Lots about Hadjidakis and Theodorakis and others.  I'd rate it as being as good as the Storace.

Many thanks.

Offline Maik

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Re: Books about Greece
« Reply #43 on: Thursday, 06 February, 2014 @ 04:04:12 »
#44 Posted 11 December 2013 - 08:32 PM by TonyKath

Hi and welcome IslandHopper,

Nice to meet another "Persephone" fan.  Bryan here recommended it but he has a "love-hate-relationship" with it.  Didn't know the author got sued!! I've just checked and it's back on Amazon with various sellers. The price for h/b is remarkably anything from £0.01 s/h to £26.75 new.  Would make a great Crimbo pressie!!

I also noticed recently that The Flight of Ikaros by Kevin Andrews is now available for Kindle.  Recommended by Maik and another great read.

Tony

Offline TonyKath

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Re: Books about Greece
« Reply #44 on: Thursday, 06 February, 2014 @ 17:47:50 »
Thanks for resurrecting this thread, Maik.    Thinks.... must read some of those books stacked up in my Kindle!

Tony

Offline Maarm

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Re: Books about Greece
« Reply #45 on: Friday, 07 March, 2014 @ 12:54:02 »
The Magic In The Receiver - review

On the very last chapter of this book but wanted to give my opinion - very much enjoyed the historical side re earthquake, Yannis story and getting a better version of the Saint Gerasimus story (other than the tourist version), also lovely to be able to sink back into Kef mentally with the descriptions of Argostoli, Fiskardo, lovely food, evenings in the gardens..........  But, and I'm sorry to be critical, I understand why the modern day story is in there for the family link but I don't think it was really needed.  The historical aspect/story would have been enough to make this an enjoyable read.  Found myself getting impatient with the "newer" characters and I read a great amount of escapist/pap fiction. 

This is just my opinion and I greatly admire anyone who can write this well, which I couldn't.

Offline TonyKath

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Re: Books about Greece
« Reply #46 on: Friday, 07 March, 2014 @ 20:37:11 »
I recently read Patrick Leigh Fermor's Roumeli having had it on my Kindle for a few months.  For those who don't know Fermor who died only fairly recently became well known with his books about his youthful walk across Europe in the early thirties.  He served with special forces/SIS during the war in Greece before the fall and then with the partisans in Crete where he famously captured the German commander on the island.  He was a lifelong Hellenophile living in Greece until his death.  "Paddy's" remarkable funeral is described on his blog along with many other aspects of his life and can be easily found via a Google search.  His Mani is probably his best known book,

Roumeli is an area of Northern Greece that has referred to various places over time and PLF just uses it as a hook for his tales about his visits to places that took his fancy in the North.  He also includes some wonderful descriptions of roughing it in the mountains of Crete just because he felt like including them.  Roumeli is one of those many Greek words where the stress is not where English would place it, in this case on the first syllable.

PLF delights in the the old and the obscure and in bringing them to life for the modern reader.  Topics include a wedding in the ancient semi-nomadic Sarakatsan people, the (then) run down and decaying monasteries of Meteora perched high on pinnacles of rock and an extensive chunk on the mainland opposite Kefalonia, including why there are no lobsters in Astakos and his attempt to repatriate Byron's slippers from Missalonghi.  He notes in passing that Kefalonians are noted for their flamboyant swearing!

At times this is a difficult book for those not so interested in the obscurities of language and history, though his lengthy excursus on the differences between romios and ellinos is right up my and Bryan's street!  :blink:   The descriptions of both landscape and his encounters with remarkable people are truly extraordinary and not to be missed. This book is a love letter to a Greece long past where modernity is rarely glimpsed and the first glimmers of tourism back in the 60's are greeted with a shudder.  For those who want to look more into what Greece was and  what still shapes it in present this is a book to both to work at and for sublime enjoyment.

Tony

Offline Maik

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Re: Books about Greece
« Reply #47 on: Sunday, 09 March, 2014 @ 15:22:45 »
Might be of interest, an article on concordmonitor.com today about Patrick Leigh Fermor:
80 years after he walked across Europe, a travel writer’s final volume

Offline TonyKath

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Re: Books about Greece
« Reply #48 on: Sunday, 09 March, 2014 @ 19:48:19 »
Thanks for that Maik.  It contains a wonderful account of PLF's writing style and it's a pretty fine piece of writing in its own right.  However I've just checked the PLF blog and see it was originally published in Slate Book Review in a longer version: http://www.slate.com/articles/arts/books/2014/03/volume_3_in_patrick_leigh_fermor_s_trudge_series_the_broken_road_reviewed.html.

Tony

Offline Maik

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Re: Books about Greece
« Reply #49 on: Monday, 10 March, 2014 @ 15:37:26 »
Another article / book that *might* be of interest (and another mention of PLF):
‘The Ariadne Objective:’ Spooks, Germans and the battle for Crete