Author Topic: Periptero, heart of the neighbourhood  (Read 687 times)

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Online Maik

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Periptero, heart of the neighbourhood
« on: Saturday, 28 October, 2017 @ 12:22:48 »
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The kiosk, an urban Greek mainstay since 1911

Athens’s first kiosk opened in 1911 on Panepistimiou Street. It’s quite possible that it would still be operating today had it not been swallowed up when the ground beneath it collapsed in 1997 during construction of the metro line that now runs beneath the central thoroughfare. Thankfully the woman who was working inside the periptero managed to get out just in time.

What kiosks look like has changed a lot since 1911, as has the legal framework governing them. They were once gifted by the state to wounded war veterans in lieu of a pension. Their value grew over time and they became property to be passed down from the original holder to his children or grandchildren. In 2012, kiosks were on the way to being liberalized, but in 2015 the coalition government of leftist SYRIZA and right-wing Independent Greeks (ANEL) reversed this, keeping the ownership and operating rights to kiosks closed off to all but those who inherit them.
http://www.ekathimerini.com/222736/article/ekathimerini/life/the-kiosk-an-urban-greek-mainstay-since-1911
« Last Edit: Sunday, 29 October, 2017 @ 11:51:49 by Maik »

Offline TonyKath

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Re: Periptero, heart of the neighbourhood
« Reply #1 on: Sunday, 29 October, 2017 @ 19:54:41 »
Quote
The kiosk, an urban Greek mainstay since 1911

Athens’s first kiosk opened in 1911 on Panepistimiou Street. It’s quite possible that it would still be operating today had it not been swallowed up when the ground beneath it collapsed in 1997 during construction of the metro line that now runs beneath the central thoroughfare. Thankfully the woman who was working inside the periptero managed to get out just in time.

What kiosks look like has changed a lot since 1911, as has the legal framework governing them. They were once gifted by the state to wounded war veterans in lieu of a pension. Their value grew over time and they became property to be passed down from the original holder to his children or grandchildren. In 2012, kiosks were on the way to being liberalized, but in 2015 the coalition government of leftist SYRIZA and right-wing Independent Greeks (ANEL) reversed this, keeping the ownership and operating rights to kiosks closed off to all but those who inherit them.
http://www.ekathimerini.com/222736/article/ekathimerini/life/the-kiosk-an-urban-greek-mainstay-since-1911

Very interesting rather longer article - well worth reading it all.

 :btu:

Tony