Author Topic: Alexander discovery  (Read 7733 times)

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Offline Maik

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Alexander discovery
« on: Tuesday, 12 August, 2014 @ 15:57:23 »
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Greece's prime minister says archaeologists excavating an ancient mound in northern Greece have uncovered what appears to be the entrance to an important tomb from about the end of the reign of ancient warrior-king Alexander the Great.

Alexander, who died in 323 B.C., was buried in Egypt. His empire stretched from modern Greece to India.
http://www.foxnews.com/world/2014/08/12/greek-prime-minister-says-extremely-important-tomb-uncovered-in-northern-greece/

Offline Maik

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Re: Alexander discovery
« Reply #1 on: Monday, 08 September, 2014 @ 07:54:58 »
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Archaeologists have unearthed two sculpted female figures, known as Caryatids, as they slowly make their way into an ancient tomb recently discovered in Greece’s northeast, the country’s culture ministry said on Sunday.

They mark a significant new finding in the tomb on the Amphipolis site, about 100 km (65 miles) from Greece’s second-biggest city Thessaloniki, which archaeologists have hailed as a major discovery from the era of Alexander the Great.

Archaeologists have said that the Amphipolis site appeared to be the largest ancient tomb to have been discovered in Greece.
http://www.ekathimerini.com/4dcgi/_w_articles_wsite1_1_07/09/2014_542718

Offline Maik

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Re: Alexander discovery
« Reply #2 on: Saturday, 13 September, 2014 @ 16:09:57 »
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Excavations at an ancient tomb discovered in August in Amphipolis, northern Greece, on Friday stirred more speculation into who may have been buried there as archaeologists worked to gain entry into a third chamber, revealed behind two life-sized marble statues of robed maidens, or caryatids.

Crews at the 2,300-year-old site on Kasta Hill will examine the structural integrity of the third entrance and of the chamber before entering what is believed to be the last section of the massive vault, which dates to the time of Alexander the Great (356-323 BC).

Its size and grandeur have fueled widespread speculation as to whom it could have been built for, with some theories suggesting it could have been a general or high-ranking official.
http://www.ekathimerini.com/4dcgi/_w_articles_wsite1_1_12/09/2014_542873

Offline Maik

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Re: Alexander discovery
« Reply #3 on: Monday, 22 September, 2014 @ 08:04:49 »
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The discovery of an enormous tomb in northern Greece, dating to the time of Alexander the Great of Macedonia, has enthused Greeks, distracting them from a dire economic crisis.

Who, they are asking, is buried within.

In early August, a team of Greek archaeologists led by Katerina Peristeri unearthed what officials say is the largest burial site ever to be discovered in the country. The mound is in ancient Amphipolis, a major city of the Macedonian kingdom, 100km (62 miles) east of Thessaloniki, Greece's second city.

The structure dates back to the late 4th Century BC and is 500m (1,600ft) wide, dwarfing the burial site of Alexander's father, Philip II, in Vergina, west of Thessaloniki.
http://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-29239529

Offline Maik

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Re: Alexander discovery
« Reply #4 on: Wednesday, 29 October, 2014 @ 10:41:31 »



Offline Maik

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Re: Alexander discovery
« Reply #5 on: Wednesday, 12 November, 2014 @ 15:09:14 »

Offline Maik

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Re: Alexander discovery
« Reply #6 on: Wednesday, 12 November, 2014 @ 19:00:10 »
More news on the BBC

Offline Maik

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Re: Alexander discovery
« Reply #7 on: Saturday, 22 November, 2014 @ 18:27:20 »
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AMPHIPOLIS, Greece -- Officials say the vast ancient burial mound at Amphipolis in Greece could contain more than one dead.

Greek Culture Minister Costas Tasoulas said Saturday scientists have started the second phase of excavation at the burial site, dating back to Alexander the Great's reign in the late 4th century B.C. He said scientists are searching for possible additional burial chambers below the splendid, three-chamber tomb discovered in August.

He said there is still a long way to go to examine the findings from the first phase of the excavation. Anthropologists will try to identify the skeleton's gender and age, but warn the full identity might never be known.
http://www.ctvnews.ca/sci-tech/scientists-expand-excavation-of-ancient-burial-site-in-greece-1.2114435

Offline Maik

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Re: Alexander discovery
« Reply #8 on: Saturday, 22 November, 2014 @ 21:29:32 »
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Paintings of daily life have been discovered on columns at Greece's biggest ancient tomb at Amphipolis in the northern region of Macedonia, the Greek culture ministry said Saturday.

"After cleaning the columns, images of people, objects and utensils were uncovered," Culture Minister Kostas Tassoulas said at a press briefing on the discovery at the site.

The paintings may help solve the mystery of who is buried at the highly-decorated tomb from the time of Alexander the Great. A skeleton was found at the site earlier this month.

"We will have the first indications (about the identity) after the bones are examined at an anthropological laboratory," said Lisa Mendoni, a top official at the culture ministry.

Archeologists had to dig their way past huge decapitated sphinxes, break through a wall guarded by two caryatids and empty out an antechamber decorated with stunning mosaics to finally find the tomb's occupant.

The culture ministry said on November 12 the remains were clearly those of "a powerful personality, which can be seen from this unique tomb", with speculation rife that it could be that of Roxana, Alexander's Persian wife, his mother Olympias, or one of his generals.
http://www.gmanetwork.com/news/story/389366/lifestyle/artandculture/paintings-discovered-at-greece-s-biggest-ancient-tomb

Offline Maik

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Re: Alexander discovery
« Reply #9 on: Saturday, 29 November, 2014 @ 20:16:26 »
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An ancient tomb discovered in northern Greece dating from the time of Alexander the Great could belong to a general, said Greek Culture Ministry officials Saturday.

...prompting excited speculation that it might house the remains of Alexander the Great, who died in 323 BC and whose final resting place remains a mystery.

Alexander died in Babylon, aged 32. Some experts speculate that he was buried in Alexandria, Egypt.

The king's wife, Roxanne, and their son, Alexander, were exiled to Amphipolis after his death and slain there along with his mother, brother and sister-in-law, leading some experts to believe their remains might be discovered there.
http://www.haaretz.com/archaeology/1.629112

Offline Maik

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Re: Alexander discovery
« Reply #10 on: Monday, 19 January, 2015 @ 19:16:16 »
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Mystery of Greece's Alexander the Great-era tomb deepens with body discoveries
Remains of five people found in vast, ancient tomb dating back to Alexander's era, around 300-325 BC
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/greece/11355324/Mystery-of-Greeces-Alexander-the-Great-era-tomb-deepens-with-body-discoveries.html

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Re: Alexander discovery
« Reply #11 on: Thursday, 01 October, 2015 @ 19:44:27 »

Offline Maik

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Re: Alexander discovery
« Reply #12 on: Friday, 02 October, 2015 @ 19:52:35 »

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Re: Alexander discovery
« Reply #13 on: Friday, 03 March, 2017 @ 13:15:19 »
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The culture ministry has allocated 2.5 million euros for restoration works at Kasta Hill, the excavation site of the Amphipolis tomb, newly appointed Culture Minister Lydia Koniordou told a press conference this week.

Koniordou said the funds will be released immediately for the restoration of the site in northeastern Greece, where a vast grave dating back to Alexander the Great’s era was uncovered as well as for works to unify the archaeological sites of Amphipolis and create specially designed trails for visitors.
http://news.gtp.gr/2017/03/02/greek-culture-minister-2-5m-kasta-hill-amphipolis