Author Topic: 22/04/2016  (Read 1477 times)

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Offline Jolly Roger

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22/04/2016
« on: Friday, 22 April, 2016 @ 08:30:48 »
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ATHENS--Greece's creditors have agreed to press the country for additional austerity measures if it falls short of budget targets, a move that papers over disagreements between the lenders but could test the stability of Greece's fragile government.

http://www.marketwatch.com/story/greece-creditors-push-for-more-austerity-measures-2016-04-19

Offline Jolly Roger

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Re: 22/04/2016
« Reply #1 on: Friday, 22 April, 2016 @ 08:35:24 »
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In early April, a leaked conversation between International Monetary Fund staff and the angry back-and-forth that followed were reminders that the Greek economic crisis is still here — and has kept the country in misery for over seven years. Here are five things to understand about the Greek crisis.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/monkey-cage/wp/2016/04/20/heres-why-its-so-hard-to-pull-greece-out-of-its-economic-crisis/

Offline Jolly Roger

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Re: 22/04/2016
« Reply #2 on: Friday, 22 April, 2016 @ 08:37:42 »
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Greece and its international lenders have made progress in negotiations on economic reforms, a Greek government official said on Thursday, but a final accord needed to unlock badly needed bailout loans remained elusive.

Talks on pension reforms, tax hikes, privatizations and the management of bad loans resumed this week in Athens with the aim of reaching an agreement on the package before euro zone finance ministers meet in Amsterdam on Friday to assess the progress.

"There was significant convergence, more than in the past days," a Greek government official said, adding that this concerned especially pension reforms and bad loans.

The main sticking point in the talks, which have dragged on for months, concerns fiscal issues, as EU institutions and the International Monetary Fund differ on whether it can meet a primary surplus target equal to 3.5 percent of gross domestic product in 2018. A primary surplus excludes interest payments.

http://www.reuters.com/article/us-eurozone-greece-review-idUSKCN0XI1Y6