Author Topic: Books about Greece  (Read 24478 times)

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Offline Maik

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Kidnap in Crete
« Reply #50 on: Monday, 08 September, 2014 @ 08:04:39 »
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Hellraisers with deadly intent: the hard-living war heroes who captured a Nazi general

One evening, just before Christmas in 1943, three ex-public schoolboys sat naked in a steamy bathroom in Cairo discussing how to capture a German general from outside his headquarters on the island of Crete. They were agents of the Special Operations Executive (Force 133, Middle East).

For their Christmas lunch, Leigh Fermor cooked turkey stuffed with Benzedrine tablets.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/history/world-war-two/11078599/Hellraisers-with-deadly-intent-the-hard-living-war-heroes-who-captured-a-Nazi-general.html


Article's an interesting read.

Offline TonyKath

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Re: Kidnap in Crete
« Reply #51 on: Friday, 19 September, 2014 @ 16:33:39 »
Thanks for that Maik.  I a bit of a PLF fan but didn't know that he'd kept in touch with Kreipe.

There's rather a glut of books about the kidnapping at the moment and the original Ill Met by Moonlight by "Billy" Moss has never been out of print since the early fifties.  "Paddy" has his own  version out at the beginning of October but not sure how as he popped off a couple of years back and was a notoriously slow writer.  Presumably Artemis Cooper will have ghosted it for him as with the latest of the walking across Europe books.

Tony

Offline Maik

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Re: Kidnap in Crete
« Reply #52 on: Friday, 10 October, 2014 @ 11:05:19 »
There's rather a glut of books about the kidnapping at the moment and...  "Paddy" has his own  version out at the beginning of October but not sure how as he popped off a couple of years back


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A new account of the kidnap of a German general in WW2 from occupied Crete sheds light on one of the 20th Century's most interesting men... Sir Patrick Leigh Fermor.

A decorated war hero, brilliant conversationalist, historian, Hollywood scriptwriter, perhaps the finest travel writer of his generation - the list of the achievements of Paddy, he was never called Patrick, goes on and on.

And now, three years after his death at the age of 96, Leigh Fermor's own account of the audacious wartime exploit, capturing General Heinrich Kreipe, the commander of a division on the island of Crete, evading his pursuers and getting him to Cairo, has been published, further gilding his glittering reputation.

The book, Abducting A General, recounts the incident with typical Fermor erudition and flair.
http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-29518321

Offline Maik

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Re: Books about Greece
« Reply #53 on: Friday, 04 September, 2015 @ 00:05:43 »
Haven't read The Rise and Fall of Classical Greece by Josiah Ober, Mitsotakis Professor of Political Science and Classics at Stanford University, but the Washington Post article is quite interesting:
Classical Greece was incredibly politically innovative. Why did it rise — and then fall?

Offline Maik

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Re: Books about Greece
« Reply #54 on: Saturday, 12 September, 2015 @ 04:35:16 »

Offline Maik

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Re: Books about Greece
« Reply #55 on: Friday, 17 June, 2016 @ 18:36:10 »
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A brief history of sex and sexuality in Ancient Greece

The sexual habits of people in Ancient Greece – from prostitution to pillow talk – are explored in a new book written by Paul Chrystal. Exploring the many layers of sex and sexuality in various Greek societies – from the Minoan civilisation through to Sparta and Hellenistic Greece – In Bed with the Ancient Greeks examines homosexuality, pederasty, mythological sex and sex in Greek philosophy and religion

In the beginning was sex. To the ancient Greek mythologisers, sexuality, love and sex were inextricably connected with the creation of the earth, the heavens and the underworld. Greek myth was a theogony of incest, murder, polygamy and intermarriage in which eroticism and fertility were elemental; they were there right from the start, demonstrating woman’s essential reproductive role in securing the cosmos, extending the human race and ensuring the fecundity of nature.

Simultaneously, Zeus, the top god, wasted no time in asserting his dominance over the other gods (both male and female).
http://www.historyextra.com/article/ancient-greece/brief-history-sex-and-sexuality-ancient-greece

Offline Maik

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Re: Books about Greece
« Reply #56 on: Thursday, 14 July, 2016 @ 13:51:13 »
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The whimsical fable of Greece’s financial insolvency that you’ve been waiting for

Some crises are sexier than others. People are inclined to ask about the Great 9/11 Novel or the Definitive Novel of the Arab Spring. They are less concerned about the Whimsical Fable of Greece’s Financial Insolvency.

Deborah Levy’s “Hot Milk” is, somewhat unexpectedly, that fable.
https://www.washingtonpost.com/entertainment/books/the-whimsical-fable-of-greeces-financial-insolvency-that-youve-been-waiting-for/2016/07/13/7b21c16a-37fe-11e6-9ccd-d6005beac8b3_story.html


 :hmm:

Offline Maik

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Re: Books about Greece
« Reply #57 on: Saturday, 22 October, 2016 @ 12:32:04 »
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Poop and pray: on domestic devotion in ancient Greece and Rome
New discoveries are changing how we understand ancient domesticity

Asclepius was the god of medicine, introduced from Greece to Rome in the early third century BC. The chapter “Health Matters: Kitchens and Bathrooms” is characteristically full of fresh insights. Sofroniew notes the presence of a lararium near the latrines in a house in central Pompeii decorated with a fresco of Fortune and a man emptying his bowels. An inscription above him reads “cacator cave malum”—“crapper beware of evil”.
http://theartnewspaper.com/comment/reviews/books/poop-and-pray-on-domestic-devotion-in-ancient-greece-and-rome/

Offline Maik

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Re: Books about Greece
« Reply #58 on: Tuesday, 25 October, 2016 @ 16:24:25 »
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Byzantium or Medieval Greece?

I received my master’s degree in “Byzantine” history and during my studies I never questioned the legitimacy of “Byzantine” in describing or distorting the history of the Greeks after their forced conversion to Christianity in the fourth century of our era. Greece had been a Roman province since 146 BCE.

Emperor Constantine, for reasons unfathomable to this day, dumped the many gods Greco-Roman civilization for the one Jewish-Christian god. He triggered that civilization earthquake in his new capital, Constantinople, now Istanbul.

But neither Constantine, later emperors, nor Christian Greeks and Christian Romans would imagine their empire was Byzantium or that they were Byzantines. They considered themselves Roman.

I prefer Medieval Greece to Eastern Roman Empire because, starting in the seventh century, most emperors were Greek and the language of the state was Greek. This Medieval Greece included the territory of the Eastern Roman Empire: Palestine, Syria, Egypt, Asia Minor and Italy. It lasted for more than 1,000 years.

The conquest of Medieval Greece by the Turks in 1453 was a result of centuries-long enslaving of the peasants, the loss of young men to monasteries, the abandonment of national armies for mercenaries, and the hostility between Greek East and Latin West. In 1054, the Eastern and Western Christian churches excommunicated each other. This civilization schism was followed by the fourth crusade. In 1204, Venetians, Germans and French sacked Constantinople, slaughtered its residents for days, burned its libraries, and dismembered Greece.

The Greeks recaptured Constantinople in 1261 but they remained vulnerable to powerful enemies. The Europeans exploited them. This was ideal for the Turks. They stepped into the power vacuum the Westerners had created in Medieval Greece.

There was a silver lining to the fall of Medieval Greece. Its scholars rushed to Padua, Venice and other great cities of the West. They carried with them the culture of ancient Greece. They translated into Latin key Greek scientific and philosophical texts, which triggered the Renaissance.

A few European scholars also saw the value of editing Medieval Greek texts, thus inaugurating the study of Medieval Greek civilization. One of those scholars was Hieronymus Wolf, a sixteenth-century German intellectual who edited Medieval Greek historians. Wolf coined the term Byzantium for the Eastern Roman Empire. He and other European scholars thought “Greek” ought to be reserved for ancient Greece. As for “Roman,” it was out of the question since the West had its own Roman emperors.

Wolf’s “Byzantium” triumphed in the scholarly community, at great cost to the integrity and understanding of Medieval Greek history and culture. Few people understand that under “Byzantium” there are centuries of Greek history, not ancient Greek history, but Christian Greek history, which is Greek history nevertheless. “Byzantium” and “Byzantine” obscure the contributions of Medieval Greece to this very day.

“A Short History of the Byzantine Empire” (I. B. Tauris, 2015) by Dionysios Stathakopoulos demystifies Medieval Greek history.
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/evaggelos-vallianatos/byzantium-or-medieval-gre_b_12626380.html


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Byzantium (Greek: Βυζάντιον Byzántion) was an ancient Greek colony on the site that later became Constantinople, and later still Istanbul. Byzantium was colonised by the Greeks from Megara in c. 657 BC.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Byzantium

Offline Maik

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Re: Books about Greece
« Reply #59 on: Friday, 05 May, 2017 @ 18:11:47 »
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Adults in the Room by Yanis Varoufakis review – one of the greatest political memoirs ever?

The leftwing Greek economist and former minister of finance tells a startling story about his encounter with Europe’s ‘deep establishment’
https://www.theguardian.com/books/2017/may/03/yanis-varoufakis-greece-greatest-political-memoir

Offline TonyKath

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Re: Books about Greece
« Reply #60 on: Friday, 05 May, 2017 @ 21:36:33 »
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Adults in the Room by Yanis Varoufakis review – one of the greatest political memoirs ever?

The leftwing Greek economist and former minister of finance tells a startling story about his encounter with Europe’s ‘deep establishment’
https://www.theguardian.com/books/2017/may/03/yanis-varoufakis-greece-greatest-political-memoir

Thanks Maik - have just downloaded the review to my Kindle to read at leisure.  Saw the end of an interview with him  on ? Newsnight the other night but hadn't realised he was plugging his book.  Available on Amazon for £9.99 (Kindle) £10 ish p/b.

Offline Alan

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Re: Books about Greece
« Reply #61 on: Thursday, 13 July, 2017 @ 16:19:58 »
Its a shocking read, as European leaders allow the brutal punishment of the Greek people following the collapse of French and German banks, leaving Tsipras and Varoufakis with only impossible choices. Shameful.

Offline TonyKath

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Re: Books about Greece
« Reply #62 on: Monday, 24 July, 2017 @ 14:22:45 »
Thanks for your comments Alan.  Must admit I've only read the first 20 or so pages in the Kindle sample which underwhelmed me after all the hype.  However you have spurred me on plus the the article in Protothema that  Maik picked up.  It stays at £9.99 so I will list it on IQReader and see if the price drops.

Tony

Offline U4ea

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Re: Books about Greece
« Reply #63 on: Monday, 24 July, 2017 @ 17:08:27 »
Not sure if this  sheds any more light on it.

« Last Edit: Monday, 24 July, 2017 @ 17:10:45 by U4ea »

Offline Alan

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Re: Books about Greece
« Reply #64 on: Tuesday, 25 July, 2017 @ 09:29:10 »
The story is told in dramatic terms, but the events were part tragedy and part farce. Shouldn't be surprised what happens when Europe is run by undemocratic means, but I did still find it shocking.

Offline Maik

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Re: Books about Greece
« Reply #65 on: Friday, 18 August, 2017 @ 21:01:19 »
#4 Bryan-in-Kilkis. Posted 12-09-2012 @ 14:17

What a thoroughly superb idea, Tony!!! I have a few suggestions:

2) (Three books by the same author) Crying Blue Murder / The Last Red Death / The Golden Silence, all by Paul Johnston. Paul Johnston struck on the ingenious idea of inventing the character of Alex Mavros, an Athens-based private investigator who is half Scots and half Greek, and these books are detective stories, a genre almost totally unknown in Greek literature itself. Such great authors as Mark Billingham, Jeffrey Deaver and Val McDermid have given these books glowing reviews. I have to admit that what I read in them as regards life in Greece was thoroughly convincing. I usually pencil in a note in the front of books I read after I have finished them saying when I read them and my impressions of the book, and for each of these I have put the one word "Excellent".

Well, I finally got around to reading the first in the series and really must follow up on the rest. Anyone who likes the genre might like The Destroyers, by Christopher Bollen (Kindle version available). Haven't read it but there's a favourable review in the New York Times: Money, Murder and a Missing Heir in a Thriller Set in Greece.

Offline TonyKath

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Re: Books about Greece
« Reply #66 on: Saturday, 19 August, 2017 @ 14:31:11 »
Thanks for the re-post of this, Maik.  Helps explain why I couldn't find any Greek language crime fiction in the bookshop in Ioannina last May- apart from translations of US/British books, of which there were quite a few, but which I didn't want.  I was trying to find something with relatively easy vocabulary and which reflected modern Greek society and language.  In the end I followed the a recommendation from the assistant and got Το Σπίτι με τους Πέτρινους Αέτους (The House with the Stone Eagles) for only €4 as it turned out - a bargain for a Greek book.  Fairly much reflected the first two criteria though not terrifically well written which has led me to pause it.  Greek language review on Goodreads - looks like with spoilers.

The Paul Johnson books are not on Kindle but have just bought the first one s/h via Amazon £0.01 plus £2.80 p+p.

Tony

Offline Aristarches

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The Sinking of HMS Perseus and the seaman who survived
« Reply #67 on: Friday, 06 October, 2017 @ 12:12:41 »
Just gor back from Kef. and I thought I must mention this book by Jeanskala, a regular contributor to this site and the auther of several books about Kef.

I must declare an interest as I was given my copy by Jean and although I abhor the criticism of an eleemosynary treat I can honestly say that I found this book both very enjoyable and very informative.  It will be of interest to any visitor to Kef but, in particular, any visitor to the southeast of the island where much of the action takes place.  I can thoroughly recommend it.

I am not sure where the book is on sale but I am sure if you pm Jeanskala on this site she will let you know where you can buy a copy.

Offline TonyKath

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Re: Books about Greece
« Reply #68 on: Monday, 26 March, 2018 @ 17:41:29 »
#4 Bryan-in-Kilkis. Posted 12-09-2012 @ 14:17

What a thoroughly superb idea, Tony!!! I have a few suggestions:

2) (Three books by the same author) Crying Blue Murder / The Last Red Death / The Golden Silence, all by Paul Johnston. Paul Johnston struck on the ingenious idea of inventing the character of Alex Mavros, an Athens-based private investigator who is half Scots and half Greek, and these books are detective stories, a genre almost totally unknown in Greek literature itself. Such great authors as Mark Billingham, Jeffrey Deaver and Val McDermid have given these books glowing reviews. I have to admit that what I read in them as regards life in Greece was thoroughly convincing. I usually pencil in a note in the front of books I read after I have finished them saying when I read them and my impressions of the book, and for each of these I have put the one word "Excellent".

Well, I finally got around to reading the first in the series and really must follow up on the rest. Anyone who likes the genre might like The Destroyers, by Christopher Bollen (Kindle version available). Haven't read it but there's a favourable review in the New York Times: Money, Murder and a Missing Heir in a Thriller Set in Greece.

Have finally read Crying Blue Murder during the cold winter months in the UK. Great recommendation and a great read.  It's set on the fictional Cylcades island of Trigano some time round 2000 and touches on traditional values in Greek family life, the international art trade and the British role with the Greek resistance in WWII.  The private eye is Alex Mavros who investigates several rather bloodthirsty murders but like most of his kind has flaws of his own which I would imagine are resolved in the final volume of the trilogy.  I look forward to reading the next two but they are slightly tricky to track down.  I got mine for £0.01 s/h + p&p off Amazon. 

**My copy is available to anyone here for free and no postage for a donation preferably to KATS  or alternatively a charity collection box of your choice.  Please PM me with your details.  UK only, please.
**Tony

Offline Maik

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Re: Books about Greece
« Reply #69 on: Monday, 26 March, 2018 @ 17:58:50 »
...in the final volume of the trilogy.  I look forward to reading the next two but they are slightly tricky to track down.  I got mine for £0.01 s/h + p&p off Amazon. 

No longer a trilogy! Not sure what it is but there's (now) seven of 'em. Paul Johnston: Greek Private Eye Novels. *Looks like* they next two are available on Amazon, haven't checked for the later ones. I found Crying Blue Murder in my local library.

Offline TonyKath

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Re: Books about Greece
« Reply #70 on: Monday, 26 March, 2018 @ 18:13:55 »
Gosh thanks Maik.  Had no idea.  The site also gives summaries of the now seven Alex Mavros books.

 :btu:

Tony

Offline Colleywobble

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Re: Books about Greece
« Reply #71 on: Wednesday, 28 March, 2018 @ 20:04:14 »
Just got "The White Sea", the seventh book in the series, from the library yesterday. Don't usually read detective books but will give it a try. Keep you all posted!!