Author Topic: Router-modem danger  (Read 1992 times)

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Offline Maik

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Router-modem danger
« on: Friday, 21 February, 2014 @ 20:04:17 »
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Security failings in home routers exposed

Serious security failings in home routers are getting more attention from both attackers and researchers.

In recent weeks, attacks have been mounted on Linksys and Asus routers via loopholes that thieves could exploit.

This week the Internet Storm Center (ISC) warned about a continuing attempt to exploit a vulnerability in 23 separate models of Linksys routers.

The virus, a self-replicating program or worm called The Moon, takes control of the router and then uses it to scan for other vulnerable systems.

In a statement, Linksys said it was aware of the Moon malware and said it took hold on hardware only if a Remote Management Access feature was turned on. Turning the router off and disabling the remote management system should clear out the worm, it added.

Linksys has also published technical advice about how to update the core software for vulnerable routers and how to turn off the remote management feature.

Earlier this month, many users of Asus routers who remotely connect via the gadget to hard drives in their homes, perhaps to watch DVDs they have ripped, found that someone had used the same feature to upload a text file urging them to do more to make the device safe.

Asus released a software update last week to close the loophole.

The two incidents come soon after Poland's Computer Emergency Response Team reported a large-scale attack on home routers by thieves seeking log-in names and passwords for online bank accounts. That attack infected vulnerable routers with software that snooped on traffic before passing it on to the bank sites people were trying to reach.

A separate study by security firm Tripwire has found that 80% of the 25 best-selling routers available on Amazon are vulnerable to compromise.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-26287517


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Routers and modems are two of the most common computer peripherals, yet many people don't know the function of each one. While the two devices may look similar, they each serve a difference purpose.

A router is a small box that allows multiple computers to join the same network.

A modem is a device that provides access to the Internet.

While the router and modem are usually separate entities, in some cases, the modem and router may be combined into a single device. This type of hybrid device is sometimes offered by ISPs to simplify the setup process.
What is the difference between a router and a modem?


Might be worth checking if your router-modem is still using the default password, usually "password".

Offline TonyD

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Re: Router-modem danger
« Reply #1 on: Saturday, 22 February, 2014 @ 11:19:49 »
Slipping rather too comfortably into pedantic mode......

It irritates me that "modem" is still used at all, standing as it does for MOdulator/DEModulator, and is only applicable to Analogue lines. ie How you used to connect to networks/BBs in the 70's via dial-up telephone lines.

Once the move to Digital took place, MODEM was redundant, as the signal is already digital.

In my view, "Router" is what "Modem" once was, whilst "Switch" (or at a stretch, "Hub") is what is now commonly referred to as "Router"

Offline Maik

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Re: Router-modem danger
« Reply #2 on: Saturday, 22 February, 2014 @ 15:56:58 »
Could be wrong but *I think* most of us out here are still on analogue telephones lines (not sure about Bryan in Kilkis).

Offline Bryan-in-Kilkis

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Re: Router-modem danger
« Reply #3 on: Saturday, 22 February, 2014 @ 21:15:42 »
Tin can and string here, Maik...  ;)

Offline TonyD

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Re: Router-modem danger
« Reply #4 on: Sunday, 23 February, 2014 @ 11:52:26 »
The few systems I've got involved with on my travels there have all been ADSL - delivered over copper telephone lines - but digital nonetheless.